Monday, 22 July 2013

OCD in the Home

Obsessive-compulsive disorder, also known as OCD, is just one of the many kinds of anxiety disorders affecting millions of people around the world. People with OCD often find that they do specific rituals and these obsessions can make it very difficult to interact with people in public. However, if you stay home all the time, you are actually hurting yourself even more. There are many ways to OCD-proof your home in order to move forward with your treatment and with overcoming OCD in your life completely.

First, you need to identify your obsessions. People obsess with everything from fear of dying to germs. Your obsessions will be the things you think about all the time, even when you wish you weren’t thinking about them. Next, identify your compulsions. Compulsions will be things that you feel like you must do because of you obsessions. For example, you may feel like you need to clean you bathroom a certain number of times a day or say a phrase a certain number of times repeatedly. Knowing your specific obsessions and compulsions is not difficult, but it is nevertheless the first step to helping to improve your condition while at home.

OCD might become a regular part of your life while you are at home where as you might be able to control yourself more readily when you are in public. Why? You may simply find it embarrassing to give in to your obsessions when you are around other people. That proves that you can actually have control, you just don’t want to, for whatever reason, when you are at home. To combat this, invite friends into your home often. When your home becomes, essentially, a public place, you’ll be less tempted to give in to your obsessions and compulsions, and over time your brain will be automatically programmed to perceive your home as somewhere where these activities are not ok.

Another great way to combat OCD in the home is to purchase a stopwatch. Whenever you begin to obsess about something stop the watch, and when you’re back in control, stop the watch. Do this throughout the day and then every night check out your total time for the day. You may be surprised about the time you’ve been wasting! Chart your progress and keep in mind this waste whenever you begin to obsess—you could be doing more enjoyable things with your time. OCD affects everyone, not just you, so by stopping your OCD behavior in the home you can work on a positive step towards recovery for yourself and those around you.

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